Groundbreaking for Purdue Bands & Orchestras

APPROVED BY THE PURDUE Board of Trustees in December 2019, the $20 million, 37,500-square-foot, four-story facility will be built at the southeast corner of Third and Russell streets. It will be along Third Street’s Student Success Corridor, which connects student residential areas with the campus’s academic center.

“This is a momentous day for Purdue Bands & Orchestras, it’s over a thousand current students and it’s more the 15,000 alumni around the world,” Purdue President Mitch Daniels said. “Thanks to the tremendous generosity of Marc and Sharon, as well as other donors to the project, our world-class program will have this wonderful new facility to develop and showcase its tremendous talents.”

The facility is named for Marc and Sharon Hagle in honor of their $10 million leadership gift. “Sharon and I are excited about a world-class home for one of the best bands in the land,” Marc Hagle said. Hagle Hall will provide dedicated space for the 134-year-old Bands & Orchestras program, which has operated in Elliott Hall since that facility’s completion in 1940.

Since fall 2013, Purdue – which has no music school – has seen a 65% growth in participation in Bands & Orchestras and currently counts more than 1,036 students in more than 30 ensembles, concert bands and jazz bands, as well as the marching band. These students – 72% of whom are in STEM disciplines, including 41% in engineering – boast an average grade-point average of 3.28, which is higher than the campus average.
“We are excited about the future and for what this new facility will mean for all of our students,” said Jay Gephart, the Al G. Wright Chair, director of bands and professor of music. “What we have done and will do, as alumni and friends working together, will be remarkable.”

Purdue Bands & Orchestras anticipates taking occupancy in July 2022. Learn more.

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